Plate dented in – how to sort it out?

DELFTship forum General Questions Plate dented in – how to sort it out?

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    • #38677
      Fidel
      Participant

      Does anyone know how to sort out the dented nose, as per attached image? Appreciate any constructive comment.

    • #38678
      Maarten
      Keymaster

      I am not sure which aspect you refer to- if you want the crease edge along the top to be straight, you can use the align function, which will project all selected points on selected axes. Please see the manual for details.

    • #38679
      Fidel
      Participant

      Maybe this will help.

      Aligning is not a solution due to the geometry of the tip of the model. It’s the boundary edges that are pulling the plate ends out and are creating the distortion. I saw some models (when they were accessible from this site) with the properly designed nose of a similar shape, but did not download them at the time and now have no idea which ones I saw, to look at their solution for the end shape…

    • #38681
      Fidel
      Participant

      Sorry for the multiple messages but the forum doesn’t allow me to edit the messages and it keeps reverting to the first image, and deleting it. Hopefully this time it came out right.
      Nosedentedin2.jpg

      The tip is unsightly and I would like it to look proper, as it should.

    • #38682
      Maarten
      Keymaster

      Our online model database is now accessible from DELFTship itself:
      simply select New Project (CTRL-N) -> Online model database.
      I hope you find your solution there 🙂

    • #38683
      Fidel
      Participant

      Maarten, with all due respect, I was looking for a constructive advice (from anyone). I am aware of the option in the Delftship, but I am using the Freeship, which doesn’t have it. Being pressed with time, I posted my question to see if someone had dealt with this issue before and could share their experience.

    • #38684
      Icare
      Participant

      ¡Hola Masrapido!

      I’m not sure I understand your problem, but I think you need do draw a diagonal line in the lateral panel (soft edge).
      Why so? Because you have to consider the drawn surface as elastic. The superior and the front edges of the panel are pulling the surface towards the plane of symmetry and curve it toward this plane. The diagonal line I suggest would prevent this kinda collapsing… well… I hope so…

    • #38688
      Fidel
      Participant

      Que tal Icare.

      No space for diagonals, unfortunately, as you can see on this image. It’s already a triangle at the tip. The plate is pushed in at the tip, in the red circle. It’s quite visible and an eyesore. I was going to ignore it and smudge it up with gypsum on a printed model, but every time I open the file and see it I cringe…

      I tried with more soft edges across the tip, in transverse direction, but that only makes the indent smaller – a bit.

      Nosedent3.jpg

    • #38694
      Icare
      Participant

      (Answer written before your last post)

      I’m back after trying to re-create the problem.

      I quickly generated the default hull and closed the volume with a deck… and I didn’t alighted on your problem. Obviously you didn’t closed the deck the same way I did…

      But I noticed there was a depressed area near the down part of the bow. So I began playing with the top and down parts of the bow, creating and filling up depressions.

      Conclusion: There must be a missing line or an excess point in your drawing.

      I hope the annexed commented screenshots will help you understanding what you’ve to do.

      <font color="#ff0000]After reading your last post[/color]: after seeing the screenshot I think you’re using much too many lines to define your volume. Remember: the simpliest is the best.[/color”>

      Finally, I think it’s possibly a problem of graphic rendering. Check it with the “slice lines” (Verificalo con la visualizacion de las rodajas)!
      An other way to fix it may be to dull the stem shapeness (Un otro modo de arreglarlo quiza seria de desafilar el filo de la proa).

    • #38695
      Fidel
      Participant

      Gracias Icare por tus comentarios. You may be right about the lines/points either missing or having excess. I’ll try to run the boat through PolyCAD and see what happens there. Don’t think the number of the lines would be the culprit. But right now anything is posible.

    • #38703
      Fidel
      Participant

      After some playing around with other software too, I came to a conclusion that it is the inherent characteristic of the control lines and how they interact with the plate surface.

      Why is it happening? Because all the control lines are converging into the one point at the tip, the plate is being crunched, resulting in deformation above. Icare’s solution does not have that problem because the lines are parallel to the top line and each has its’ own point on the vertical control line.

      I tried to do that, but the general design form suffers and to fix it it would require too much work for a result that is purely cosmetic so I left it be. When I print it out in 3D printer, I’ll fill it in it with plastelin and sand it to shape. I doubt my kid will notice it.

    • #38704
      Icare
      Participant

      Since children will use your canoe, I suggest you build a bulkhead (mamparo) inside each end:
      – It will prevent the hull concavity (your problem);
      – It will rigidify the shape;
      – It will be a buoyancy reserve (reserva de flotabilidad), so even when the canoe will be filled up with water, she won’t sink.

      It’s not the smarter solution, but, well… :dry:

    • #38712
      John Owles
      Participant

      From what I see, you could have too many lines radiating from the same point on the point. Try adding points around the perimeter so that you have each one line to one point on the perimeter and fairing from there. I hope this makes sense.

    • #38753
      Grieg Pedersen
      Participant

      I agree with Icare. I’ve found that the more lines that come together at a point, the harder it is to control the geometry. You could conceivably use all those lines, still (though simpler is better – I have a 40 footer with only 5 longitudinal lines) and I often have trouble where several sets of lines intersect. This is especially pronounced when some of those lines (like the keel line) are creases and some are not. You might try having each longitudinal line meet the keel at a different point. That will also give you much better control over the shape at the point in question.

    • #38754
      Fidel
      Participant

      Thanks to all for your comments. Yes, the issue are the lines meeting at the same point, hence my question (if anyone had a similar experience and an idea how to fix it).

      The conclusion is that the issue cannot be solved without changing the number of lines, but that is not an option in this particular case. The issue is inherent characteristic of drawing process in the program, and it clashes with the way I had formed the shape. My solution was to print the model and melt some stamp wax on the tip to fill in the hole. After some sanding and a spray of paint, the problem is gone.

    • #38762
      John Owles
      Participant

      Working with a control net requires finding the correct approach and it is not always practicable to correct the problem and alter the approach mid stream. If a ball is placed in a net, the shape of the net around the ball does not radiate from one point, it radiates around a small circle. In the case of a bulb, you are dealing with a hemisphere-ish shape at the equator (it being symetrical port and starboard) so the lines will radiate around from the centre line curve in towards the quarter-ish sphere at the outside.

      A little tricky to explain but ……. the best I can do.

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