Modelling a flat bottom chine tug hull (WWII TID)

DELFTship forum Hull modeling Modelling a flat bottom chine tug hull (WWII TID)

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    • #44633
      Paul
      Participant

      Hi all

      I want to make a steel model of a wartime TID tug. I would like to draw up the hull and export the frames and developed skins. Skins have no compound curves.

      I tried loading lines drawing but I couldn’t find anything in the manual to fully explain how to pick up the shape. Also the manual mentions using three drawings but no instructions on how to do that.

      Alternatively I see I can load a .txt file to import the keel profile and chines – but no mention of the format, unless I missed something…

      Any ideas welcome. I can draw a set of hull lines by hand and I can do CAD (mainly 2D steel work)  but this has me somewhat frustrated – and it’s too hot for that right now!

      Regards

      Paul

    • #44638
      Hrvoje
      Participant

      Hi, Paul!

      On page 29 of the DELFTship manual, you have the format of the text input file. It is very well explained what means each row and column of the file.

      Have a nice day!

      Kind regards, Hrvoje

    • #44639
      Terrance Egolf
      Participant

      Hello, Paul.

      It sounds like you are asking for some assistance in setting up background images for your model. Are you working from pre-existing plans or are you wanting to create your own plans from WW II images?

      I will provide you five files constituting a tutorial for setting up background images in DELFTship Free. I originally created these for my fellow members of the Model Ship World forums. Hopefully, you will find them useful.

      The only detail I know I have omitted from the tutorial is that, for intersections to be visible in a model file, you must check “Intersections” for the layer(s) in which a particular intersection can be visible. This selection is made in the Edit window of the Layers Menu Group. Generally, if you make intersections visible for the entire hull itself, then they should be visible for the purpose of aligning any of the background images for the model.

      The first four Tutorial files are attached here. The fifth file is in the next post (forum limitation).

      Terry

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Terrance Egolf. Reason: Added content
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    • #44644
      Terrance Egolf
      Participant

      Here is the fifth file. Please read the first PDF. It includes all the appropriate attributions and disclaimers for this tutorial. I take responsibility for any errors or inaccuracies, since these files were written more than a year ago.

      Terry

       

      Attachments:
    • #44648
      Paul
      Participant

      Thank you gentlemen, you are very kind.

      I will have to dedicate some time to learning this package properly. I was expecting it to be easier…

      Have a great day

      Kind regards

      Paul

    • #44649
      Paul
      Participant

      Hi Hrvoje & Terry

      I have another question if I may?

      Given that I would like to export developed hull surfaces and perhaps frames/sections, should I model the vessel at full size and ‘scale down’ to 1/16 or should I model it at ‘model’ scale? The full size is 65′ between perpendiculars so say around 70′  (about 21m) or a bit more overall. The model therefore should be around 1.3m.

      I was wondering if the calculations will still work on such a tiny hull? I would be interested in displacement so I don’t build too heavy and also stability and everything else out of interest.

      I love this stuff – frustrated naval architect here… I could draw a set of yacht lines when I was in my early teens (back in the 1970’s), nowadays I run a Bavaria 38 sailing yacht as a business based in Southampton, UK. Hoping to expand to the Spanish coast next year, maybe Barcelona if all goes well.

       

      Kind regards

      Paul

    • #44650
      Terrance Egolf
      Participant

      Paul,

      For modeling from existing drawings or dimensions, I’d go with using full-sized dimensions, since things like the waterline and draft are already known. Also, you can use positions and dimensions in full-size units right off the reference drawings instead of having to calculate the scaled quantities.

      If you are designing your own hull and those characteristics are not known, then you would probably  still  want to go full-size so you can use the program to determine them. Trying to do hydrostatic calculations for a 1/16 scale model would introduce all kinds of errors due to the mismatch of scale between desired model dimensions and the actual properties of water used to perform the hydrostatic calculations. I’m not a naval architect, but that would seem to be a problem.

      Terry

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