Clinker!

DELFTship forum Hull modeling Clinker!

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    • #38269
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      All right, a promise is a promise so, here’s a new topic: ” clinker or the way to have creepy dreams at night”.
      Subject is about the feasibility AND Utility of a clinker design within DS.
      My State Of the Art – for now – :

      Do Not inform SeaShepherd please!
      Whaler because it is simmetric so everything could be done once then mirror the lot, cutting drawing time.
      About utylity, and here I’d like to hear some comment from our DIY branch, to my surprise with a bit of mouse wrestling:

      Go in Tools>>Unfold:all the planks awaiting to be cut, obviously in need to add the overlap.
      So I’m moderately optimyst.
      Just need some cutting edge critic.
      Bye, Jurgen.

    • #38270
      AvatarRobert Holme
      Participant

      Hi Jurgen,

      Very Nice,
      Looks to me like it’s developable with the possible exception of the garboard strake.

      Attached for your interest is a lines plan of the RN 27ft Whaler. I have had the pleasure??? of being dropped into the ocean from a sloop in one of these in 1960 and believe me you’d be amazed at how fast you life and home can disappear over the horizon!

      Whilst the hull is symetrical in Plan, it is not symetrical in elevation.

      In Sailing configuration they were a Yawl with a dipping lug mainsail and fitted with a very heavy steel swing centreboard. They were rowed with 5 oars, three one one side and two on the other but I can’t remember which side was which.

      The RN also constructed a motorised version fitted with an Enfield 2cyl, air cooled, horizontally opposed, diesel.

      Regards
      Bob

      Attachments:
    • #38271
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      Thanks for the piece of History, I will correct the waterlines of mine, focused on planks spacing the drawing is a bit toyish…
      When a whaler became a whaler, parting from ordinary workboat design, the pure symmetry came as a life saving.
      In need to row backwards at once, change towing direction abruptly – harpoon line was secured to a log at the back – etc…
      It was a heavy And deadly job. Usually the head rower was a left-hand, no rudder of course but steering oar, sail and wooden centreboard as described.
      The boat itself became an all round design capable of rough work in any sea-conditions, proof is it survived with minor changes.
      Back to Clinker!, not so useful, my personal opinion, think a parametric CAD would do a better job but, some DS “aficionado” could have different ideas.
      Bye, Jurgen.

    • #38273
      AvatarSean Russell
      Participant

      Great looking design! I noticed that the plans Maryak posted show a much flatter bottom that the one you’ve drawn. That’s a lot of deadrise in a narrow boat on your drawing. Just an observation. I’ve drawn lots of boats for clinker construction but I only show the breaks where the planks would overlap, I don’t try to draw the 3D plank, if you know what I mean. That isn’t necessary for construction. The builder can overlap the planks. He only needs the inside of the plan to be shown. Making the planks 3D is only necessary for the visual satisfaction. Here’s a design of an 8 foot dinghy for clinker construction.

      Attachments:
    • #38274
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      That’s a piece of advice I was looking for, Thanks.
      I’ll NEVER admit my drawing are for visual satisfaction ( cheater…), for the water lines it was a speed drawing focused on planks, could have been a bathtub either, but I said thanks to Mr.Bob for the linesplan.
      In my defense Your Honor, it’s a nice feeling solving a problem, even aesthetic, and it deservs the time spent not to mention that by the way new drawing tricks are achieved.
      And now board yo’dinghy and row away…
      Jurgen.

    • #38276
      AvatarSean Russell
      Participant

      Hey, Jurgen, no criticism was meant! The boat looked great – really nice ends and perfect sheer line! I appreciate all the time you spent solving the problem of showing each clinker plank. I agree that such exercises are usually very instructive. My only point was, that if you want to build the boat, it isn’t necessary to go to all that trouble. If you want to see what it will really look like, however, you have solved the problem. I designed a little double ender myself, (8 feet) and a friend and I built it using the cedar strip composite method. Here are a couple of images.

      Sean

    • #38277
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      I knew it, Gosh sometimes for a typo or a world miss you get in trouble…
      Apologize,” I ” was meant to board that dinghy and row away…
      My experience in boat construction as not vast was only as subcontractor in big yards: carpentry, plumbing, wiring and so on.
      I regret I never had time to set and do some for pleasure, so all my respect for your nice job.
      AND all critics are well accepted; do not apologize for sustain your ideas that’s the Forum, we need it.
      Regards, Jurgen.
      P.s.: how many layers? And what for bonding?

    • #38280
      AvatarSean Russell
      Participant

      The hull is western red cedar. The strips were 1/4 inch thick. There is 6 oz. fiberglass cloth set in epoxy inside and out with an extra layer on the bottom (also inside and out). The inwales and outwales are Douglas Fir, as are the seats. Oarlock pads are oak set on cherry bases. The hull weighed 45 lbs. finished but the elaborate seats weigh 15 lbs. so the total weight is 60 lbs. It’s a real pleasure to row. Everyone who tries it comes back with a smile on their face. We laid out the station molds, set them up on a strong back and they were perfectly fair! No fairing required. There are two rowing stations so a person can sit on the aft seat and the rower can sit forward and the boat will trim (I calculated seat positions for my wife and myself). It’s pretty seaworthy. I haven’t towed it behind our sailboat yet but will in the next couple of weeks. It appeared in this month’s (May) Small Boats Monthly, the online magazine owned by WoodenBoat.

      Sean

    • #38281
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      “I like the smell of wood in the morning” – well done indeed, as a future design you can try a small sailboat, got some drawings…
      Stop for now or Webmaster will fine us for mutual flattering.
      Jurgen.

    • #38295
      AvatarRobert Holme
      Participant

      Hi Jurgen,

      A couple more images I found which may be of use in your model should you wish to incorporate a sail plan

      Regards
      Bob

      Attachments:
    • #38297
      Avatargiorgio zuppin
      Participant

      Thank you Bob, It remindes me:

      LaunchingTheJamesCaird2.jpg
      The most (in)famous small boat journey in a 23′ whaler – Schakleton or The Man who turned a catastrophe in triumph – 800 Nm in the howling fifties.
      Jurgen.

    • #38618
      AvatarKyle
      Participant

      Hello Sean.
      i think you have made a fantastic job of modelling the Henri8. It is rare to find a well drawn clinker online. My dad has built a few clinkers and I would like to help him model up and plan the next one using this software. I am new to DELFT and I would be very grateful if you could send me the file for this model? This would allow me to review how you tackled surfacing the individual strakes.

      it would be very much appreciated,
      Thank you,
      Kyle

      kyle2k179@hotmail.com

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